Pickled Sausage Recipe

Pickled sausage is certainly one of those specialties that aren’t everyone’s cup of tea, but if you enjoy experimenting with seemingly incompatible flavors and aromas, this is the recipe you need in your book.

There are numerous brands, flavor combinations, and variations of this specialty available in stores, but you can already guess that nothing beats perfectly executed homemade pickled sausage.

Since this is one of those recipes that could easily go wrong if you don’t follow the right guidelines, we’ve prepared a very detailed guide for the best pickled sausage you’ve ever tasted.

Keep on reading to learn more!

How to make pickled sausage

Pickled sausage isn’t only a great way to create a fusion of sweet, savory, and acidic flavors, but it is also the best method of preserving your favorite types of sausage, whether it be Vienna sausage, Polish sausage, or Penrose hot sausage.

In case you buy the sausages in bulk, you should definitely give this recipe a go, and enjoy homemade pickled sausage for months to come.

An important factor to remember in this process is to avoid overboiling the mixture, as this can significantly alter the vinegar – especially its flavoring and pickling quality.

Ingredients:

(for 1-pint jar)

  • 1/2 lb pork sausage
  • 1/4 tsp black peppercorn
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/3 tsp ground turmeric
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tbsp sugar

Instructions:

Step 1:

To prepare the sausage for pickling, cook it over medium heat until it is cooked evenly.

Set it aside and allow it to cool down enough for you to cut it into slices. Once it has cooled, cut the sausage diagonally. It is up to you whether you want to leave or cut off the ends.

Step 2:

Prepare a pickling jar (it can be a mason jar, or any glass container large enough to fit the sausage slices and the pickling liquid).

It is necessary to wash the jar thoroughly and ensure that it is sterilized before adding the sausage slices.

Add the sausage slices into the jar, then top them with garlic cloves, peppercorns, turmeric, as well as bay leaves.

Step 3:

The next stage of this pickled sausage recipe is to prepare the pickling brine, which is the key to a successful pickled sausage.

In a medium saucepan, combine white vinegar, water, sugar, and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil.

Step 4:

Once the pickling juice comes to a boil, you want to carefully pour it over the sausage you placed into the pickling jar.

Ensure that all the sausage pieces, including the garlic and the seasoning, are entirely covered in this hot vinegar mixture.

Make sure to close the jar with the lid immediately and allow the pickled sausage to cool down at room temperature before storing it in the fridge.

Ingredient substitutions

While the listed amounts and ingredients for the vinegar mixture should remain the same, it is up to you to decide what kind of seasonings, herbs, as well as sausage you prefer to use in this recipe.

However, if you don’t know what could make adequate substitutions for some of the elements of this pickled sausage recipe, take a look at our suggestions.

1. Beef sausage

While this recipe lists pork sausage as the top ingredient, you don’t have to fixate on this type of meat for your version of pickled sausage.

As we’ve mentioned, the key element of the recipe is the pickling liquid, which is something that should not be altered.

When it comes to the sausage, you can definitely choose beef sausage over pork sausage if you don’t enjoy pork, or you simply have beef sausage at home.

The main difference between the two types of meat (and sausage), besides the aroma and the color, is the density of the meat.

You’ll find that pork sausage is a bit more on the dense, chewy side, whereas beef sausage has a looser grain. However, depending on the sausage variety you choose, this doesn’t necessarily have to be the case.

Also, it is necessary to adjust the seasonings and herbs accordingly, depending on the sausage you choose.

For instance, if the beef sausage of your choice contains more pepper, you may want to decrease the amount of peppercorn you add to the pickling jar.

2. Curry powder

Whether you aren’t too fond of ground turmeric, or you simply don’t have any at the moment, you can definitely use curry powder to season the pickled sausage.

Turmeric and curry powder are quite similar when it comes to the flavor profile, as well as the aroma.

They’re both quite intense and dominant, so you may choose to skip this step altogether if you’re pickling smoked sausage, or you simply don’t enjoy this overpowering aroma.

Also, keep in mind that both turmeric and curry are natural food colorings, so adding them will probably alter the color of the pickled pork.

3. Onion slices

Not a fan of garlic? You can definitely replace garlic with onion slices if you prefer the sweet, yet tangy aroma onion provides.

However, we find that combining whole garlic cloves with onion slices in your pickling mixture is an even better option.

Feel free to add a generous amount of onion to the sausage slices, as you’ll definitely enjoy a crisp bite of pickled onion with the sausage.

4. Dried thyme

Many people find the aroma of the bay leaves too deep and aggressive. If this is the case with you, feel free to replace it with a dried herb of your choice.

We find that dried thyme is a wonderful, fragrant replacement for bay leaves in pickled sausage, as it complements pickled pork perfectly.

Dried thyme will certainly intensify the aromas and make this specialty even more complex, and the flavors even more interesting.

5. Mustard seed

Mustard seed is an ideal alternative to peppercorns, especially if you feel like the sausage you’ve chosen already contains enough pepper, but it is lacking that tanginess, bitterness, and spice that mustard seed provides.

Keep in mind that mustard seed is packed with flavors and it can be quite spicy and sharp, so you don’t want to go overboard.

What to serve with pickled sausage

No one will blame you for sticking to the basics when it comes to finding a dish that complements this fusion of intense flavors and aromas.

You are also allowed to experiment and find your own signature side dish for your homemade pickled sausage, especially if this is your first time making this kind of specialty in your kitchen.

Pickled sausages are served straight out of the jar and there’s no need to cook or reheat them. However, you can always serve them with a cooked dish if you’re craving a plate of warm food.

Here are some of our top options when it comes to side dishes and condiments to complement pickled sausage.

Mustard paste

Mustard is undoubtedly the number one condiment that comes to mind when sausage is mentioned, and we find that this rule applies to the pickled version, as well.

Sausage and mustard simply go together like bread and butter, and it is certainly hard to beat this combination.

Baked potatoes

In case you need a filling side dish that is more on the traditional side, you simply can’t go wrong with baked potatoes.

We suggest keeping the flavor profile pretty neutral and not overseasoning the potatoes, as the pickled sausage is already packed with many different flavors.

Cheeseboard

Pickled sausage is a rather unorthodox, but delicious snack that can be served with a platter of your favorite kinds of cheese.

The milky, rich flavor of the cheese will slightly neutralize the acidity of the pickled sausage, creating a perfect balance of flavors.

If you’re feeling bold, you could go with gorgonzola or blue cheese, but if you want something a bit “lighter”, we’d suggest a mix of manchego and Monterey Jack.

Coleslaw

We feel that coleslaw is yet another intuitive recommendation when it comes to pickled sausage, as its creaminess and richness create a perfect contrast with the acidic, savory pickled sausage.

Coleslaw also provides a recognizable acidic note that matches the flavor profile of pickled foods, especially pickled pork.

However, if you’d like the focus to be on the creaminess, you may want to add a bit more mayo to your coleslaw and exclude or minimize the amount of vinegar.

Coleslaw is also a convenient, quick way to add a bit more color and texture to your plate.

How to store pickled sausage

Just like most pickled foods, pickled sausages do not have to be stored in the refrigerator once the jar is opened.

The most important thing about storing your homemade pickled sausage is to make sure the jar is completely sterile, and the lid is tightened once you’ve poured the pickling liquid over the sausage slices.

Adequately prepared and stored pickled meat can last up to a year. In case you’ve made a bigger batch, make sure to store the jars in a dark, cold place.

However, if you notice that the meat has developed an off-putting smell, changed the color, or developed fungi in the jar, it should no longer be consumed.

pickled sausage recipe

Pickled Sausage Recipe

Prepare to let go of any misconceptions or prejudices you may have about pickled meat, as this pickled sausage recipe will change the way you preserve your meat forever. In just 40 minutes, you can have a jar of tangy, spicy, savory homemade pickled sausage on your table.
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Total Time 40 mins
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Southern American
Servings 1 pint jar
Calories 836 kcal
Equipment
  • pickling jar
  • sauce pan
  • Cutting board
  • Knife
Ingredients
  
  • 1/2 lb pork sausage
  • 1/4 tsp black peppercorn
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/3 tsp ground turmeric
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tbsp sugar
Instructions
 
  • To prepare the sausage for pickling, cook it over medium heat until it is cooked evenly.
    Set it aside and allow it to cool down enough for you to cut it into slices. Once it has cooled, cut the sausage diagonally. It is up to you whether you want to leave or cut off the ends.
  • Prepare a pickling jar (it can be a mason jar, or any glass container large enough to fit the sausage slices and the pickling liquid).
    It is necessary to wash the jar thoroughly and ensure that it is sterilized before adding the sausage slices.
    Add the sausage slices into the jar, then top them with garlic cloves, peppercorns, turmeric, as well as bay leaves.
  • The next stage of this pickled sausage recipe is to prepare the pickling brine, which is the key to a successful pickled sausage.
    In a medium saucepan, combine white vinegar, water, sugar, and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil.
  • Once the pickling juice comes to a boil, you want to carefully pour it over the sausage you placed into the pickling jar.
    Ensure that all the sausage pieces, including the garlic and the seasoning, are entirely covered in this hot vinegar mixture.
    Make sure to close the jar with the lid immediately and allow the pickled sausage to cool down at room temperature before storing it in the fridge.
Nutrition
Calories: 836kcalCarbohydrates: 27gProtein: 35gFat: 60gSaturated Fat: 20gCholesterol: 163mgSodium: 8451mgPotassium: 656mgSugar: 24g
error: Content is protected !!